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20100901
20100930
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KTVU (FOX) 21
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of what it was like moments after the deadly explosion and fire. ktvu's rob roth is in san bruno tonight with the details, rob. >> reporter: firefighters were facing, this is part of the blast zone from clairmont drive. many police and firefighters worked desperately to get people to safety, at times risking their own safety. the calls came in immediately. >> we looked out the back door and we could see the fire ball. >> reporter: the explosion hit close to home for one san bru no police officer. >> i knew living right near the blast zone, i knew my family was home. >> reporter: for most of the evening he said he didn't know if his family was safe but he kept working. his family survived. >> when we do or job, we are supposed to tune out our political beliefs, our religious beliefs, but when it hits this close to home, it's hard to do that. >> reporter: firefighters tried to fight the fire but they found that became difficult after the fire stopped a fire hydrant. >> we were left helpless, and we were only allowed so far because of the fire wall. >> reporter: many know this now burned o
decades ago. rob roth reports. >> reporter: authorities say since the federal judge blocked the execution order last evening they are no longer watching oprah brown 24 hours a day -- albert brown 24 hours a day speed up we have complied with the courts ordered to stop preparing for the execution. >> he faces the death penalty for raping a girl and strangling her with her own shoelaces. school records show he called the girl's mother and told her she would never see her dr. again been susan's family recently wrote to governor arnold schwarzenegger not to grant brown honesty and that what we see instead is the face of her murderer there is no expiration for such a delay in this man's execution. her mother wrote, he holds himself responsible for his dad. his life has been in a downward spiral ever sends. >> reporter: courts are concerned until all of the protocols are reviewed and the judge said he could not decide the case in a matter of days or hours and that's why he put the whole thing on hold to say he will need an extension. one of the drugs is to set to expire on friday that means th
rely on buses without a transit option. as rob roth reports concerned riders joined the union today as a rally. >> cuts could be coming to ac transit and soon. serious cuts. ac transit officials are considering eliminating the night owl service, no buses between midnight and 5:00 in the morning. >> you can not depend on the transit agency anymore. it is sad. >> reporter: they are looking at a proposal that would limit weekend service to such a degree many people in out lying neighborhoods would not use it. >> i work in the city nights and weekends. and to have them cut the weekends when i am just trying to make the move and they raised the bridge toll, it is ridiculous. >> reporter: the problem is money. ac transit officials say it is loses hundreds of thousands a week since the supreme court judge rule thad they could not impose a contract on the bus drivers, a contract that would of saved the district money. the bus driver's union and the transit agency are attempting to hammer out a new contract. the union leaders, community environmental groups rallied to fight for public tran
and as rob roth reports it's a glimmer of hope for the unemployed in the bay area. >> reporter: the latest unemployment figures are not just statistics, they are daily struggles. this woman says she worked as an office assistant at macy's for 19 years and was laid off in june. >> i used to see it on tv and i am now here as one of those people it is a little discouraging. >> reporter: she came here today looking for leads for new jobs and remains hopeful for now. >> you are just so used to having your paycheck coming into your bank every week. you know, it is just hard to realize that. that was my big wake-up call. >> economists see a glimmer of hope in unemployment numbers private employers created more jobs than anticipated and that has not helped his 41 year old father who worked as a technical support manager until one year ago when he was laid off bt says he found part-time work but wanted something permanent. >> the positions i do get called back for the often tell me they receive 100, 200 resumes per job so there is a lot of competition with the unemployment rate being so high. you
walker. why would they send my parents a check? chase what matters. >>> rob roth is live in the city tonight with what's being proposed about keeping teachers from staying and living in the city they teach. >> reporter: frank, this is all that's left of a long, abandoned high school. but san francisco officials say this property could one day be a place teachers can call home. the teachers' union says about a third of all teachers live outside of san francisco. many just can't afford to live in the city. >> we want to be part of the community where we teach. i love coming to school and seeing the kids on san bruno and being part of the community where i teach. so i would love to live here as well. >> reporter: many teachers end up leaving the district after a few years to teach closer to where they live. >> we lose people because they can't afford to live in san francisco. they -- they will be doubled up, they will be tripled up with other people. >> reporter: the board of education tomorrow is expected to instruct the district to hammer out a plan to convert the mission street prope
in 1980. ktvu's rob roth is at san quentin now with that report. >> reporter: here blind these gates at san quentin -- here behind these gates at san quentin are being allowed to see the new chamber. the new chamber is about five times larger than the previous one. here is a side by side comparison, the new chamber is what used to be a visitor center. it is here that albert greenwood brown is scheduled to die at one minute past midnight a week from tomorrow. it would be the first execution in california in almost five years. >> we're following the regulations to the t. >> we're preparing for an execution. we're preparing to facilitate one next week. >> reporter: the chamber room is clinical looking with bare white walls. the new facility has a larger viewing area with separate sections each for relatives of the victims and guest of the condemned. before witnesses and relatives were crammed into one room. >> it's night and day. much larger. >> reporter: in the drug infusion room, four phone hot lines have been installed, including one that goes directly to the governor and one to the
place all future executions on hold. rob roth explains today's development. >> reporter: the delay will give the courts time to weigh in on the state's legal injection protocol and also today california attorney general jerry brown announced a halt all executions in california beginning friday's. >> there's a shortage of a key drug used in executions that renders inmates unconscious. the attorney general's office said this office will recommend that future executions be scheduled when the california department of corrections and rehabilitation expects the drugs to be available. the statement did not say when that would be and a spokesman declined to be interviewed. officials say the drug is available through the execution of albert brown condemned of the week and killing of a 15- year-old girl. >> we know why the state was rushing to conduct his execution even though there are court challenge is pending. >> reporter: today attorneys seeking to halt the execution of condemned killer albert brown asked the superior court judge for a temporary restraining order while officials can re
violates california's directive bargaining rule -- collective bargaining rule. rob roth has more on this story. >> reporter: we're here in front of the dnv office in east oakland, where state workers are hoping their day in court will mean more days on the job. by midday the line stretched to the back door with the office closed three fridays a month, the dmv becomes more crowded on the days it's opened. >> i don't like it. >> reporter: the workers don't seem to like it much either. the furloughs ordered by governor schwarzenegger resumed last month after workers endured a year and a half of forced days off. the furloughs amount to approximately 15% pay cut. >> we can't travel. we can't go places on the weekend. we have to budget. >> reporter: rachel works facility air pollution division for the california environmental protection agency. for her the furloughs have her worried about whether she can keep her home. >> it's really impacting us. we're having trouble figuring out if we can stay in the house. >> reporter: she says because of furloughs closing the offices and state buil
canceled the execution at least for now. rob roth is standing by at san quentin prison with more developments. rob? >> reporter: julie, for more than a week san quentin had been preparing for an execution but not any more. prison authorities say sips federal judge jeremy fogel blocked the execution order last evening they are no longer watching albert brown 24 hours a day and the execution team has stopped practicing the state's newly that will ininjection protocols. >> we have complied with the court's order to stop preparing for the execution for tomorrow. >> reporter: brown faces the death penalty for raping 15- year-old susan jordan of riverside and strangling her with her own shoe laces 30 years ago. court records show brown even called the girl's mother and told her she would never see her daughter again. susan's family recently wrote to governor schwarzenegger asking him not to grant clemency. she says all the public knows is that some faceless teenaged girl was murdered back in 1980. what we see instead is the face of her murder research. there is no explanation for such
atlanta, i'm sorry john lisck. >>> ktvu's rob roth is live in san francisco now with how bay area muslims are reacting to today's late development, rob. >> reporter: gasia, many muims are gathering here at this mosque on golden gate avenue for the late afternoon prayer session. in a way it appears their prayers may have been answered. early this afternoon,these muslims prayed for peace here at the aljabel islam. that after pastor jones called off the burning of the koran. >> if you do that, the relationship around the world, the relationship between the society and outside, it's good to stop. good for the muslim and american -- more the muslims around the world. >> reporter: the very notion to burn the koran is offensive, for some it's very disrespect. he played us this phone message he got yesterday as a threat to burn the koran. >> i'm going to send a -- for every one you burn. it's outrageous. >> we're supposed to be like family. i feel that. i have big family in america. >> reporter: when we spoke to iman shedi he said he was fareful ofhow burning the koran could worsen the relationsh
to normal life does not come easy. rob roth joins us now, he's in san francisco with some of the challenges veterans face. >> the war in iraq might be ending but for many returning veterans the war at home may be about to begin. >> reporter: going from the battlefield to civil life is not easy. >> if i'm home, you're just expected to be able to tone down your mental activity, your heart rate and to be able to react and interact with people in your daily life that is different from the way you were expected to react in combat. >> reporter: the veterans services administration worry that members may be suffering of severe brain injury without everyone knowing it. >> it's traumatizing for the individual, why can't i remember anything, why can't i sleep. >> reporter: in this tough economy, many of those returning could ends up homeless. there's concern about depression. 222 soldiers committed suicide last year. >> we as a society have to know that when a war is over, war isn't over. we can't just say welcome home, turn the page and go on to the next news piece. >> reporter: the support of frien
writing and interviewing. today's rob roth spoke to some of them about just how hard things are. >> reporter: for these people here at the state unemployment office in san francisco, the latest unemployment figures are not only statistics, they are their daily troubles. this woman says she worked as an office assistant for macy's for 20 years. >> i used to see it on tv, and now i'm here, i'm one of those people. >> reporter: she remains hopeful for now. >> it's just disconcerning, i am just so used to having your paycheck, just comes into your bank every week, mine used to come and it's not going to be coming. it's just hard to realize that. that was my big wake up call. >> reporter: economists say a glimmer of hope in the august unemployment numbers. private employers created more jobs than expected. but that's not helping craig. he said he found part time work the last year but wants something permenant. >> the positions that i do get called back for, they often tell me they receive 100, 200 resumes per job. so obviously there's a lot of competition with the jobless rate being
they are in for major inconveniences. rob roth has their response. >> reporter: hundreds of struggling families live in these low cost houses in what used to be the alameda naval station. hundreds count on the bus line but after this weekend it will not run. >> i do not drive, and because of this, i need the bus for everywhere i go. >> reporter: the 31 runs from alameda point and ends in emeryville. but ac transit does not consider the route a major corridor. so it's one of the feeder routs being eliminated beginning in december. wheeler says she'll be stranded literally on an island with no suitable way to get to grocery stores, church or any where else. >> especially on the weekends, there's no life. the fact of the matter is we have nothing here to say we have any community help like people with cars. so the bus is really important to us. >> reporter: this mother of two is now homeless and is now getting back on her feet. with no bus service, she worries about getting to the bus. >> my son has asthma, sometimes i have to take him to the hospital and i can't get there unless i call the ambulance,
what the condemned inmate is spending his full-time hours. rob roth is live with our report. >> reporter: here outside the gates of san quentin state prison, the first anti death penalty protest has just broken up. over the last few minutes, marin county deputies have arrested several protesters. the protesters peacely stood in front for more than an hour. cars lad to be diverted to another gate in the ison. the protesters said they wanted to send the message that the death penalty needs to end in california. >> we believe that death is wrong. >> reporter: the clock is still ticking toward the execution scheduled for thursday two days from now. prison officials have already moved albert greenwood brown to a segregated cell where correction officers watch him around the clock. brown's relatives and friends have been visiting him. >> he's been staying calm and collecting his thoughts. >> reporter: we're told brown was not always an ideal inmate since he first entered san quentin. he was often moved to a probe b. he has recently been assaulted another inmate. >> he has been a p
, governor schwarzenegger stepped in and called for a delay. ktvu's rob roth is standing by. he's at san quentin with the latest developments. rob? >> reporter: julie, it has been a day of twists and turns here at san quentin prison, where officials are preparing for the execution of albert brown by lethal injection. i just speak with governor schwarzenegger's office. they are confirming that the governor is delaying the execution by almost two full days, they say, to give brown's attorneys a chance to exhaust all appeals. schwarzenegger says the delay will give the courts time to weigh in on the lethal injection protocol. also today, jerry brown announced a temporary halt of all executions in california beginning friday. that's because there's a shortage of a key drug used in executions, sodium thiapenthol. in a statement, the attorney general's office says -- >> reporter: the statement didn't say when that would be and the spokesperson declined to be interviewed. officials say the drug is available for the execution of albert brown, condemned for the rape and killing of a 15-year- old
services to half. rob roth reports. >> reporter: cuts could be coming to ac transit and soon. serious cuts, ac transit officials are considering eliminating the night owl service, that would mean no buses between midnight and 5:00 in the morning. >> you can't depend on the transit agency anymore and that's really sad. >> reporter: they are also looking at a proposal that would limit the evening services. >> i work mainly nights and weekend, to have them cut the weekends when i'm just trying to make the move and they've raised the bridge toll, it's just ridiculous. >> reporter: ac transit has just raised fares. >> we were forced to return to the spending level that is now causing us to spend $300,000 per week over what we had budgeted so we're just getting further and further in the hole. we don't print the money. >> the union did not do a, b, c, d so guess what public, we're going to take your service away on nights and weekend. so, to me it seems like, executive vandalism. >> reporter: the bus drivers union and the transit agency have entered into binding arbitration in attempt to hammer
and now as rob roth reports investigators are trying to determine if it was inside job. >> reporter: the robbery happened inside six flags at about 11:00 p.m. last night hours after the park had closed the. >> two are the subjects were dressed with a black hooded sweatshirts and they have a bandanna up over the top of their faces so you cannot see what they looked like. they were armed with semiautomatic handguns. >> reporter: investigators say that they had picked a lock in an employee area and scaled a fence and pointed their guns at three employees who were gathering banks of cash receipts and yelled at them's. >> get down on the ground, get down on the ground! >> reporter: they say yesterday was a busy day here in park officials say there are no surveillance cameras but perhaps nearby. >> we were told that there were some surveillance cameras in the park and we are looking to see if they have been able to capture the subjects i don't. >> reporter: investigators are not sure whether the armed robbery was an inside job but they didn't seem to know a lot about the operations her
this evening. reporting live, rob roth ktvu news. >>> just two weeks into a new school year some nevado students are being moved around because their classrooms were overbooked. the nevado school district says 20 to 30 students are being transferred this week. the district is limiting kindergarten to a 20 student minimum. >>> the man accused of shooting an undercover freemont police officer was met with a sea of blue today at his arraignment. 70 off duty officers packed the courtroom as the attorneys for andrew baientos waived the reading of his charges. barrientos admits to committing the crime but says he didn't know young was a police officer because young was not wearing his uniform. >> whether this is a tragic misunderstanding or a tragic incident remains to be seen. >> reporter: officer young remains hospitalized in serious condition. >>> the pain staking search of a landfill in pittsburgh will continue tomorrow as investigators attempt to bring closure to the family of fredrick sales. today was the fifth day the teams combed through trash searching for clues or the body of sales.
and many ran into roadblocks. law enforcement, rob roth is live with that. >> reporter: the road brock you see behind me here is one of several police are established throughout the burned perimeter. hundreds can't get into check on their homes. authorities worry about safety and looters. one family spent the day in limbo. they have no idea if their home survived. >> the hardest part is having nothing. having no clothes, no phone, no car, we left on foot. we have nothing. we have a mother-in-law here that took us in. >> reporter: still a lot of memories attached to their home of ten years but no way to find out, at least not today. >> it's hard not knowing. it's hard. i mean everything that we own is in that house. >> reporter: a few folks were allowed in under police escort to get medication or other emergencies. others begged and pleaded just to look. >> just want cross the street and look and see if the house is there. >> reporter: this woman was sure she lost her home of three decades. >> my home was the most happiest, just a beautiful neighborhood, my friends, my neighbors, every
, there are still three people missing. the victims span three generations, all from the same family. rob roth is live in san bruno this evening with more on what he learned about them today. >> reporter: frank we're near the 1600 block of claremont drive. it's an area so devastated, police still have it blocked off. within the past hour, residents of this area were loaded onto buses and escorted through the streets. it's the first time the residents have had a look of their destroyed homes up close. at least one of the families that lived in this block was killed by the blast, a mother and daughter, and the only three people listed as missing also lived on this block -- the bullis family. neighbors say lavonne e bullis lived here for decades and say greg, her son, and his wife and son moved in with her recently. sue -- sue bullis was at home when this happened. >> something happened they would help you. they were hee he really nice -- they were really nice neighbors. >> reporter: friends say they were too distraught to speak publicly. students have been told someone is missing from the campus
their homes. rob roth has the stories of those first responders. first we go to maureen naylor who's is live tonight in san bruno. >> reporter: frank, that ntsb briefing is about to start in a few minutes behind me. today the city declared this a disaster area while the emotional toll is still being felt by some residents here. the images of charred remains in the middle of this san bruno neighborhood are still tough to grasp. burned out cars, stairs leading to nowhere. and for the family living next to the devastation, life is on hold. >> at least six months until we can get back into the house. how are you going to bring a two and don't know if i can com to this. >> reporter: and some children are haunted by the sounds of the fire. >> every time you hear the revs of engines or planes, it's the exact same sound that came. i can see why people thought it was an airplane. because it had that same kind of revving sound. and in fact, my kids are saying, is that the fire coming. >> reporter: pg & e crews worked on the neighborhood while the homes that have been green tagged are busy wi
thousands of passengers. rob roth has our report. >> reporter: cuts could be coming to ac transit and soon, serious cuts. ac transit officials are considering eliminating the night owl service. that would mean no buses between midnight and 5:00 in the morning. >> you can't depend on the transit agency anymore and that's really sad. >> reporter: they are also looking at a proposal that would limit weekend service that people in outlying areas wouldn't be able the usit. >> i work nights and weekends, to have them cut the weekend while i'm just trying to make the move and they've raised the bridge toll, this is ridiculous. >> reporter: the issue is money. ac transit says it's losing hundreds of thousands of dollars a week. the bus drivers union and the transit agency have entered into binding arbitration in attempts to hammer out a new contract. leaders and community leaders protested. protesters are demanding that some funds be diverted to municipal transit agencies. even if that happens, it may come too late to stave off cuts in the transit. the board of directors is expected to vote in abo
of how they did it, there's questions if they had help from the inside. rob roth has our report. >> reporter: police investigators say they are not yet sure whether the robbery here at six flags discovery kingdom was an inside job, but the robber sure seemed to know a lot about the operation here. police say the robbery happened inside six flags at about 11:00 last night, hours after the park had closed and all guests had left. >> two armed suspects that were inside the park, they were dressed with black hooded sweatshirts, they had a bandana over their faces, so you couldn't see what they looked like. they were armed with semi automatic handguns. >> reporter: who men had locked in an employee only area to get inside. they then pointed their guns at employees who had been gathering bags of cash from around the park. then the gunmen yelled at them. >> get down opbd ground, get down on the ground. >> reporter: park officials say there are no surveillance cameras where the robbery occurred but there are near by. >> we are told that there may have been some surveillance cameras, and
somerville. >> and i'm julie haener. why a vote to close a school could put students at risk. rob roth has the story. >> reporter: julie, many en
the closure, people who live and visit the area will still be protected. rob roth is live in marin county with our report. rob? >> reporter: gasia, for more than 50 years, station 52 has been the only fire station in the marin headlands but tomorrow, it are likely start to phase out and close for good. these two firefighters were checking the hoses and water pressure today. come next friday, they will be unemployed. a crew will remain until early november. after that, the presidio fire department will be disbanded and 14 firefighters will lose their jobs. >> i'm worried about my future, losing my home, providing for my family. it's a very stressful situation. >> reporter: station 52 serves a very populated area but the air jaw -- area does get crowded with visitors. come october 1st, the southern marin fire district will be responsible for the area. its nearest station is about five miles away. >> you will had have somebody die here and the park service will have blood on it hands. >> you are looking at five, six minutes for response times. >> but federal officials say response times will
of their home or when -- one police officer -- tomorrow at the earliest. reporting live in san bruno. rob roth. >> also today the grim business of finding the root cause of the explosion and deadly fire storm started in ernest. many agencies, federal, state, local and pg and e are involved. we are live now in san bruno with that coverage. >> reporter: what's interesting is that a lot of the stuff that's going to be looked at going to be recovered, analyzed and they will do something about it. fg and e still isn't allowed access to their pipeline. only the ntsb has access now. >> gas pipeline. part of the transportation system in terms of how it's managed. >> reporter: it's here at the gas control system that pressures monitored but they are always going up and down depending on demand. it's when you get a big drop that the alarms go off. they went off early yesterday evening but shutting down a broken pipeline doesn't stop the high pressured gas. >> we are shocked. we don't run it, we don't maintain it, to have this type of event. when they happen it's really jarring. >> reporter: gas pipel
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26